The Lost Milestone

The Lost Milestone

.

The cast iron plate that was fixed to the milestone on the Bath Road in the dip between Cumberwell and Farleigh Wick has not been in place for a good many years. This was a pity because three others -in Market Street, at Widbrook and Trowle Common- still exist.

Luckily, it has now turned up and has been given to Bradford on Avon Museum. It...

Read More

New Museum booklet: Bridges of Bradford-on-Avon

New Museum booklet: Bridges of Bradford-on-Avon

The latest in Bradford on Avon Museum’s series of publications is a well-illustrated historical survey of the town’s bridges -across the river, canal and railway. Ivor Slocombe has included new research from his delving into records in the Wiltshire & Swindon Archives and has section on the footbridge which (so far) never was.

The booklet is on sale at the Museum,...

Read More

Museum Collection: Transport

Museum Collection: Transport

.

Click on the thumbnail pictures for a bigger view

A copper alloy button with the intertwined letters GWR. It would have dropped off the uniform of a Great Western Railway employee and was found in Sandy Leaze, which was a field that was built over in the 1960s.

.

Read More

Old Photographs: Road Transport

Old Photographs: Road Transport

.

Click on the thumbnail pictures for a larger view

The Bradford Roads Trust tollhouse at Holt in about 1880, around the time when the toll roads were being made free. The schedule of toll charges was painted on the board on the wall of building on the left, which is where the tolls were collected.

Bradford Turnpike...

Read More

Old Pictures: Kennet & Avon Canal

Old Pictures: Kennet & Avon Canal

.

Click on the thumbnail pictures for a larger view The Upper Wharf of the canal in Bradford’s Frome Road in about 1925, with a wooden horse-drawn barge being prepared for work. Just above the tiny cabin of the barge can be seen the small building which was the lock-keeper’s office. To its right is one of the diamond-shaped cast iron signs that showed the weight...

Read More

The Kennet & Avon Canal: timeline

1723: The River Kennet Navigation opened, Newbury to Reading

1727: The River Avon Navigation opened, Bath to Bristol

1788: In April, a canal linking the Kennet and Avon proposed at a meeting in Newbury

1789: Surveyed route presented to shareholders in the summer

1793: The Kennet & Avon Canal Act passed on 27th August

1794: The first sod cut, at Bradford,...

Read More

Explore the Kennet & Avon Canal

Explore the Kennet & Avon Canal

Bradford on Avon & Holt & Westwood & Winsley, Wiltshire .

The River Avon was canalised between Bath and Bristol in 1727, while to the east, the River Kennet Navigation from Newbury to the confluence with the River Thames at Reading had...

Read More

Old Photographs: Motorcycling

Old Photographs: Motorcycling

. Members of Bradford Motorcycle Club posing for a group photograph in Druce’s Hill, Church Street. Many of them have sidecars for conveying wife/girlfriend and child. No helmets are worn, but most of the drivers have goggles. The date would be after the beginning of 1912, when one of the bikes was registered.

Read More

Royal Enfield Motorcycles

Royal Enfield Motorcycles

Westwood and Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire

.

In June 1941, during the Second World War, part of the Royal Enfield Company moved from Redditch in Worcestershire to old underground stone workings at Westwood Quarry. In the safety of the quarry the firm carried out the manufacture of Type 3 predictor...

Read More

Holt Junction Station

Holt Junction Station

.

Enamelled sign from the station, now in the museum

.

The original plan of the Great Western Railway (GWR) between London and Bristol in 1830 was for there to be branches to Bradford, Trowbridge and...

Read More

Tollgates and Milestones

Tollgates and Milestones

. The costs of making and keeping up the turnpike roads were financed by charging tolls for their use, with a scale of charges depending on the size of the individual vehicles and other traffic. Toll houses with gates were situated at the edges of the settlements, within which such upkeep on the roads as was carried out was the responsibility of the...

Read More

Turnpike Roads of the Bradford Hundred

Turnpike Roads of the Bradford Hundred

 

Click on the map for a larger version.

The roads of the Bradford Roads Trust are in red; other turnpike roads are in blue.

The first Bradford Road Act in 1752 authorised a Turnpike Trust to make, maintain and charge tolls on a road from Combe Bridge (at the boundary of Bradford with Monkton Combe, near the Viaduct) to Winsley, Bradford,  Staverton...

Read More

Garages

Garages

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Gerald...

Read More

Explore Bradford: The Canal Wharves

Explore Bradford: The Canal Wharves

Past the Canal Tavern pub the Frome Road does a sharp double bend over a hump-back bridge which takes it across the Kennet & Avon Canal. Beneath the bridge is the first canal lock above Bath, which separates lower and upper canal wharves. The lower wharf mainly handled coal coming from the Somerset coalfield and stone going westwards, while the upper wharf handled various goods...

Read More

Canals to Bradford on Avon

Canals to Bradford on Avon

.

The Kennet & Avon Canal was fully opened in 1810, connecting the town to London in the east and Bristol to the west. The Somersetshire Coal Canal linked it to the North Somerset Coalfield and the Wilts & Berks Canal and North Wilts Canal gave easier access to the Midlands. The Dorset & Somerset Canal was intended to link the...

Read More

Stokeford Bridge

Stokeford Bridge

Limpley Stoke and Winsley, Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire

.

As a route to Bath, horses could cross the Avon at Stoke Ford, at the foot of Winsley Hill. In 1731 Thomas Dike of Limpley Stoke and Moses Cottle sr of Winsley, who owned the land on their respective sides, agreed to build a bridge over the Avon. Stokeford Bridge was in...

Read More

Limpley Stoke Station

Limpley Stoke Station

The station dates from 1857, when the Bradford to Bathampton branch of the Wilts Somerset & Weymouth Railway (WSWR) was finally completed by the Great Western company (GWR). A small yard was used to load building stone from nearby quarries, but closed in 1960.

Limpley Stoke became a terminus and a junction in 1910 with the construction of the Camerton Branch of the GWR’s...

Read More

Avoncliff Halt

Avoncliff Halt

A halt was opened by the Great Western Railway on the Winsley side of Avoncliff on 9th July 1906. There had previously been a siding for stone from Westwood Quarry on the other side of the aqueduct. Somehow it was not closed in the 1960s, when so many others were axed, largely because it was impractical to replace it with a bus route. Local people in period costume celebrated its 150th...

Read More

A Bradford-centric railway map

A Bradford-centric railway map

Bradford was well-served by railways, but was not really the hub of the system! The map shows lines and stations, some still functioning, some swept away by the Beeching axe in the 1960s.

.

 

click on the map for a bigger...

Read More

Railways

Bradford was promised a branch line in the original Great Western Railway (GWR) Act of 1835, terminating at Kingston Farm next to The Hall, but it was not built. Again, a line through Bradford to Bathampton was included in the Wilts, Somerset & Weymouth Railway (WSWR) Act of 1845, probably to block the London & South Western Railway (LSWR)’s ambitions for a line to Bristol....

Read More