Explore Wingfield

Wingfield, Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire

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Click on the thumbnail photographs for a larger view

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Wingfield ChurchThe only remaining medieval part of the Parish Church of St Mary is the 15th century battlemented west tower, with pierced stone bell chamber windows. The rest was rebuilt in the 18th century and a north extension that houses the organ and vestry was added in 1861. It is all faced in ashlar stone and roofed with stone tiles, except for Welsh slate on the chancel.

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Wingfield Church interiorThe interior of the church has an 18th century ‘gothick’ nave window and is under coved plaster ceilings; the chancel ceiling has a rosette in each panel. The building work was probably carried out in 1732. The pews have doors, like earlier box-pews, but combined with late gothic style decoration.

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Church Farm, WingfieldNext to the church is Church Farm. The big farmhouse, of rubble stone, gabled, with stone mullioned windows under relieving arches is dated 1636. The buildings around the farmyard no longer have agricultural functions, but have been converted to housing.

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Wingfield SchoolAlong Church Lane is Wingfield School, a single-storey building with windows in 16th century perpendicular gothic style. It was designed in 1849 and opened in 1852. Since then it has been extended at the back and a further building added beyond. Since 2001 it has been part of what is called the Mead School, sharing facilities and name with a new school on the Paxcroft housing development in Hilperton.

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Church Lane leads from the Bradford to Rode Turnpike road. The recent development called Moore’s Yard is on the site of the timber yard that was run by the Moore family.

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The Poplars, WingfieldLying back from the Turnpike, opposite Church Lane and just off Shop Lane is The Poplars public house. Besides its beer from Wadworth of Devizes and its food, a major attraction is that the village cricket ground is on the same site. From 1880 until the 1920s it was run by George Tucker Couch, who died in 1923 and is buried in the churchyard. It was sold in the following year to Wadworth.

 

 

Shrapnel shell, gate of Midway Manor, WingfieldNorth of Wingfield, well on the way to Bradford, Midway Manor lies back from the road. Its gate piers are topped with four cannonballs, which represent the exploding shells that were invented by General Henry Shrapnel, who lived there. The gate piers are also carved with the shells and with the names of battles that were won using them. The present house was built in 1893 by a later owner, Henry Summers Baynton. Shrapnel left the place to go and live near Southampton.

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