Explore Atworth

 

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Atworth ManorAtworth Manor House lies on the edge of the old village centre, on the lane to Bradford. It is of five bays and two storeys, faced in ashlar in an early 18th century style with segment-headed windows. At the rear is a barn dated 1740 and both buildings have the initials AEK for Anthony and Elizabeth Kingston.

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St Michael's Church, AtworthOnly the tower remains of the medieval church of St Michael and All Angels, which was originally a chapel of Bradford’s Holy Trinity parish church. The hall-like building alongside dates from 1832 and was designed by Henry Goodridge, the architect of so many late Georgian villas in Bath.

> Old postcard photograph of the church

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former Foresters public house, AtworthFacing on to the small square at the old centre of the village was The Foresters pub, seen here in 1994. It would have been two houses originally, built of rubble stone with stone mullioned windows. In the 1990s its name was changed to the Thirsty Beggar, then closed, reopened as the Forresters  (sic) and unfortunately again closed, permanently. It has now been converted to a house, with another new-build house behind.

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Churchfield School, AtworthNot far from the former Foresters on Bradford Road is Atworth School. The original small single-storey building was provided in 1828 by Robert Blagden Hale (1780-1855) who was MP for West Gloucestershire. Extensions were built in 1882 and 1896. Because it was so small, in 2006 it joined up  with Monkton Farleigh School and jointly known as Churchfields School.

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Poplar House, AtworthFurther along the road from the church towards the main road is Poplar Farmhouse, named after the line of trees outside, an ashlar-faced early 18th century house with a later Tuscan-style pedimented doorway, under a stone-tiled mansard roof. This is an addition that was built on to the front of an older house that still exists behind. Barns and other farmyard buildings are at the rear.

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Independent Chapel, AtworthJust before the junction of Bradford Road with the main road is the Independent Chapel. It was built towards the end of the 18th century with pointed gothick windows and doorway under an unusual pointed hood.

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The clock tower, AtworthRight on the junction is the clock tower, which was erected to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee in 1887. It has gone on to become the memorial to those who served and those who died in the two World Wars. The tower and its clock mechanism were restored in 1999 in advance of the Millennium.

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Atworth Village HallAtworth Village Hall is set back from the southern side of Bath Road. It was built in 1913 as Atworth Institute, with the foundation stone laid by Mrs Emily Georgina Jane Fuller, wife of George Pargiter Fuller (1833-1927) of nearby Neston House and a Bradford magistrate.

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The White Hart public house, AtworthNow the only pub in Atworth, The White Hart is a big building that is situated on the Melksham to Bath main road, where it served as a coaching inn. It is an 18th century Georgian building (recorded in 1771), faced in ashlar stone and having a mansard roof covered in limestone tiles which could have been quarried nearby.

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Former New Inn public house, AtworthA pair of originally identical early 18th century houses on the main road, the right one of which (no. 143) was formerly the New Inn, which closed in the 1960s. It was there in 1788, when landlord John Aplin retired and sold it (and 3-4,000 gallons of strong beer), so it was not very new! Next door was also an inn, the Butchers Arms, in 1841.

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Albion House, AtworthAlbion House, on the southern side of the main road (no. 47) was the  grocery and bakery of Frederick Victor Greenman in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, becoming the Post Office and Stores, which were run by the Misses George and Dowse in the 1960s.

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Former Ebenezer Chapel, AtworthEbenezer Chapel, on the corner of the lane that leads to Purlpit and Whitley was Atworth’s Baptist church. It is dated 1860 and the always small congregation was taken under the wing of the Corsham Baptists. It closed in 1979 and was converted into a house in around 1990.

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Cottles House, now Stonar SchoolCottles House is  a mansion in the Georgian “gothick” style, built in the 1770s to designs by Thomas Jelly and John Palmer of Bath. There is a large Elizabethan fireplace inside that may have come from a previous house on the site. The house is now at the centre of Stonar School, a private school for girls that moved here from Stonar, near Sandwich in Kent in 1939, at the outbreak of World War 2.

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