Bradford Notables

Stephen MoultonStephen Moulton (1794-1880) brought Charles Goodyear’s invention of rubber vulcanisation to England, setting up his factory at Kingston Mill in Bradford on Avon in 1848.

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John MoultonJohn Moulton (1839-1925) was a son of Stephen Moulton, the founder of the rubber industry. Besides his connection with the rubber company, he was a notable benefactor of the town, providing for the town’s baths and contributing to the foundation of the Technical School in 1897.

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Lord Edmond FitzmauriceEdmond George Petty-Fitzmaurice, 1st Baron Fitzmaurice (1846-1935) was a son of the 4th Marquis of Lansdowne and a Liberal politician, an MP from 1868-1885 and 1898-1906. He retired to Leigh House in Bradford and is remembered for his involvement in many local organisations, especially for the school which became named Fitzmaurice Grammar School in his memory (the name continues in the present Fitzmaurice Primary School).

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General Henry ShrapnelLieutenant-General Henry Shrapnel (1761- 1842) was a soldier whose name has passed into the English language as the word for pieces of metal thrown out by an explosion. He was born in Bradford as a member of a family of clothiers, many of whom have memorials in the parish church. As an officer in the Royal Artillery in 1784 he invented an anti-personnel weapon in the form of a a shell which exploded in the air. It was used in many battles until the end of the First World War. He lived at Midway Manor, between Bradford and Wingfield.


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Rev Richard Warner BA, FLS (1763-1857)  was Rector of Great Chalfield from 1809 until his death. He was an antiquarian who wrote many books on topography and history, including Hampshire Extracted from Domesday, History of the Isle of Wight, History of Bath, and History of the Abbey of Glastonbury. He had an interest in geology and his collection, since lost, was the first to be arranged by William Smith, the “Father of English Geology”.


John Hodder Moggridge (1771-1834) was born in Bradford, son of clothier John Moggridge whose father Michael had come from Topsham, Devon. The Moggridges were in partnership with another clothing family, the Yerburys and John Hodder married Ann from that family. By the early years of the 19th century he had become landed gentry and was living in Dymock, Gloucestershire, but in 1812 sold up and moved to South Wales for the rest of his life. He is mainly known for founding the towns of Blackwood and Ynnysddu in Monmouthshire to provide better living conditions for poor workers and for standing for Parliament against powerful hereditary interests.

Sir Richard Bethell, Lord WestburySir Richard Bethell, 1st Baron Westbury (1800-1873) was born in what is now called Westbury House in St Margaret’s Street, the son of Dr Richard Bethell. He became a lawyer, was made Queen’s Council in 1840 and Solicitor-General in 1852, when he was also knighted. He was MP for Aylesbury from 1851 to 1859 and Attorney-General in 1856-8 and 1859-61 and was made Lord Chancellor in 1861, resigning in 1865.

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William Bonaparte-WyseWilliam Charles Bonaparte-Wyse (1826-1892) was an Anglo-Irish-French poet who wrote in provençal and was one of those who maintained it as a literary language. He was a grandson of Napoleon’s brother Lucien. He live at Woolley Hill House in Bradford during the 1860s, returning to his native Ireland in 1872. While he was in Bradford, he became briefly the Captain of the local army volunteer force, the 9th Wiltshire Rifle Volunteer Corps, in July 1866.

 

Stéphane Mallarmé, French poet

Stéphane Mallarmé (1842-1898) the French symbolist poet, best known for L’après-midi d’un faune which inspired Debussy’s musical piece of that name, was a visitor to Bradford. He was staying with his friend and fellow poet William Bonaparte-Wyse at Woolley Hill House in 1871 when he wrote the poem Dans le jardin.

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