Explore Bradford: Woolley Street & Holt Road

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Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire

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Woolley Street continues on from Silver Street in the direction of Holt and Melksham. The name is a corruption of the name of the medieval St Olave’s chapel. The same happened when St Olave’s in Southwark became Toolley Street. Here it was also influenced by the outlying hamlet of Woolley to which it led.

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Click on the thumbnail pictures for a bigger view.

1 Woolley StreetNo.1 Woolley Street, on the corner of White Hill is a small house that shows signs in its stonework of having been updated in the 18th century. The trace of the gable of the earlier house can be seen, with additions to square up the front, a classical cornice and a wide Georgian door.

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3 Woolley StreetThe next house, no. 3, is a small two-bay Georgian house with an ashlar front and pediment over the door. The cornice is continuous with the older house to the left.

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Audley's, 5 Woolley StreetThe house called Audley’s, 5 Woolley Street is Georgian, of three bays and three storeys in fine ashlar with a tuscan porch and a short simple balustrade. In the 19th century, it was the house of the Adye family, who were mostly medical men. Recently the ground floor has been an antique shop.

 

7 and 9 Woolley Street.7 and 9 Woolley Street were built to look like a single large house with a 1-2-1-2-1 window rhythm on the two upper floors. Of the three street doors, that on the right gives on to a passage that leads through to the back garden. Part has been another antique shop, called The China Hen.

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Cranford, 11 Woolley StreetNo. 11, Cranford, is another building that looks as if it has had a makeover in the past. It is likely to have been refronted with the insertion of big sash windows and to have once had two gables. The left street door leads through to the back garden.

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Kingston Lodge, Woolley StreetKingston Lodge, 13 Woolley Street, retain its basic late 17th century form, of rubble stone with mullioned windows and stone-tiled roof. Notable changes are the addition of two 19th century canted bay windows and porch.

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Lynchetts, 15 Woolley StreetThe house called Lynchetts has three “venetian” windows, two of them in the canted right-hand side. It was requisitioned in World War 2 as the headquarters of the Admiralty’s Chronometer Department, the works of which were largely housed in temporary huts at the back. Many historical timepieces from the collection at Greenwich were stored here. The house belonged to Bradford Preservation Trust for a while.

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Moxham's, Woolley StreetMoxham’s is a mid-Georgian mansion of five bays and three storeys, with a Doric door surround on fluted pilasters. Another bay has been added to the left, with an arch on the ground floor that leads to a small yard and the garden.

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St Olave's, Woolley StreetSt Olave’s is an early Georgian seven-bay, three-storey ashlar mansion that is distinguished by the line of open pediment hoods above the first-floor windows and  a Gibbs-style doorway with heavy blocks and keystone.

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Dower House, Woolley StreetSet back from the road is The Dower House, a neat Regency villa under a shallow pyramidal roof, with a tent-roofed gothick verandah of wrought iron along the front. The Cheltenham-like effect is spoilt by the addition of an unfortunate dormer in the roof.

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Woolley Street turns sharply off left up a short hill which is known to locals as “Frying Pan”; the line of the road continues as Holt Road towards Holt, Broughton Gifford and Melksham.

Woolley Hill HouseWoolley Hill House, a three-storey three bay Georgian house, was the home of poet William Charles Bonaparte-Wyse (1826-1892). His friend the French poet Stephane Mallarmé (1842-1878) wrote the poem Dans le jardin here. They were both influential in the preservation of Provençal language and culture.

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> Woolley and Woolley Green

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Holt Road

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The Hall today, seen from Conigre HillThe Hall, Holt Road, is a mansion dating from the Middle Ages and greatly remodelled in the early 17th century.

> More about The Hall

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Kingston Farm developmentA piece of the land at the beginning of Holt Road belonging to the Hall Estate has been developed for housing in 2016-2019, taking its name from Kingston Farm. The streets are named after associates of the late Dr Alex Moulton.

 

 

Anthony Best DynamicsOn the edge of the housing development, the company of Anthony Best Dynamics has expanded to a new building designed by SRA Architects of Bath. AB Dynamics is a high-tech company that designs test equipment and robotics for the car industry worldwide.

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Mortuary chapel, Holt Road Cemetery 1856Holt Road Cemetery was opened by the Town Commissioners in 1856 under the provisions of the Burial Act of 1853. The buildings were designed by the Bath architect Thomas Fuller (1823-1886), who was also responsible for Bradford’s Town Hall, several buildings in Bath and in Canada.

> Gravestones at Holt Road Cemetery

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